Have You Ever Recorded Sound Effects?

Greetings, Naylor blog-ites.

Greetings.

I spent the past weekend at a cottage, making the teaser trailer for Abyss Crew.

The goal for the weekend was the following:

  • Film the videos for the trailer—I was lending my awesome acting skills for this;
  • Sync up the video and audio recordings;
  • Do the montage for the trailer;
  • Record and edit the sounds for the trailer;
  • Put the created audio in sync with the different sections of the trailer.

Prior to going to the cottage—we went from Friday afternoon to Monday morning—, we planned two long hikes: one on Saturday and one on Sunday. Turns out we only hiked on Saturday. It was a 4-5 hour hike, up Mont-Orford. We decided to skip on the Sunday hike; we had much more work to do than initially planned.

Cottage_2.jpgDamien, Pol, Fanny, and myself, in our ‘office’ – The Famous Abyss Crew Team

With regards to the trailer, here is what we did:

  • Friday late afternoon and evening: discussion about the script, the plans for the weekend, and the video recordings to be done.
  • Saturday: setup of the recording area, and recording of the video and audio for the trailer.
  • Sunday: recording of all the audio in the cottage to be used as sound effects—my favorite discovery of the weekend, hence the title of this post—, montage of the video, editing of the audio recordings, and adding the initial audio effects to the trailer.
  • Monday morning: syncing up the sound effects with the trailer, tweaking of final details and bugs, and final export of the video.

It was a weekend packed with learning, physical activity, laughs, long discussions, debates, early rises and late crashes, board games, and cooking. I’d do it again anytime!

What about the recording of the sound effects? This is a long prelude to your main topic.

Impatient, as always. I’m getting there.

Good.

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We recorded sounds in several areas of the house. Damien (black shirted stud in the picture) and Fanny (in the picture above) experimented for an hour or two, with pots, woks, water, knives, glasses, and anything you can think of.

Once they had finished, we all gathered in the bathroom for the recording session. We recorded water splashing in pots and pans, water falling gently and constantly into a pan filled with water, screeching of pan covers on the bath tub surface, hits and bangs on surfaces dulled with towels, and more.

After, we recorded the fridge hum, glasses hitting glasses, knuckle-flicks on the old-school television screen, knife hits, and more and more, and some more.

I have always wanted to live the experience of recording sound effects, and this was my first experience of this. I lavished in it, and hearing the final teaser trailer was thrilling, sending goose-flesh down my arms. I also managed to learn a good deal about Adobe Premiere, seeing as I was put in charge of doing the montage.

When the trailer is ready, I will write a short post sharing it.

Have you ever done sound effect recording? If so, what was the most innovative sound you recorded? If not, what would be the most innovative sound you would want to record?

Audio-note: hummmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

Don’t Starve – The Video Game

Ever since I’ve started playing video games, I’ve always loved those in which you need to survive. Whether it be trying to find food in the wilderness, build a house from scratch, or even strive in space, these games have always appealed to me. The feelings they brought were visceral, as if it was really me there, trying to stay alive, surviving ever so slightly, on the brink.

Are you able to survive in real life at least?

So far, I’ve been doing alright.

Anyways, in 2013, a game such as this was released on STEAM: Don’t Starve.

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Don’t Starve is an open world survival game. You spawn in a randomly generated world, with no resources whatsoever. You must walk around and collect resources, such as grass, flint, rock, etc. Then, using the resources you’ve gathered, you craft items such as an ax to chop down trees to collect wood for fire, a farm to plant seeds to grow vegetables, a parasol to protect you from the rain so your tools don’t get all wet, and the list goes on.

When you spawn, you are considered to be on Day 1. Each day lasts about 8-10 minutes, part day and part night. You normally being in summer—or fall—, so the days are long, and the nights are short and warm. Your goal is to survive as long as possible, or to escape the world through a cascading set of objectives—that are never stated in the game; you must simply learn then as you play, through exploration and cunning.

At evenfall, you must prepare for the darkness: you need to have a light source, or else you die in the pitch of the night, attacked by abyssal creatures that you never see.

For those who watch Game of Thrones, you are all familiar with Winter Is Coming.

So are those who live on Earth, seeing as winter comes every year.

Yes, but I’m sure you get the point. Give me some slack, just sometimes.

In Don’t Starve, winters looms over your mind like a guillotine over a bandit’s neck: you must prepare for winter constantly, because food will be scarce, your character will freeze to death if not kept warm, and days are short and treacherous, which do not allow you to explore and collect resources as you do in the summer.

Did I mention that you must also take care of your hunger level—eat some nice veggies to partially fill your belly, or cook a meal in the crock-pot for a full replenishment—, keep sane—dig up graves, you get scared, your sanity drops, but pick flowers, you feel good, your sanity level increases slightly—, and monitor your health—if you start starving, your health drops rapidly until you find food, if you take one hit from a spider without your armor you could lose a fifth of your health, and don’t even get me started on Beefalos.

There are also caves, wild animals, hoards of spiders, angry walruses, and other imaginative creatures that haunt you at every forest turn. And the music in this game is stellar. It reminds me of Sherlock Holmes.

Here is a screenshot from the game, to give you an idea of the art style—a hat has been crafted to help keep warm during the winter:

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There exists a multiplayer version, called Don’t Starve Together. In this, you can play with up to 5 other players, and attempt to survive the wild together. Two expansions also came out following the original game. In one of them, you are no longer in a forest-scene, but on a seafaring adventure: you ride little boats, find islands full of monkeys that steal all your goods, and much more.

Have you ever played this game? If not, what is your favorite survival game?

Foot-note: not starving of starvation is comforting, but starving of starvation is deadly.

Have You Ever Been To A Video Game Music Concert?

Yesterday, after having recorded my weekly podcast, my friend Francis and I were sitting down, chatting, and browsing the interweb—yes, that word exists!

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On my Facebook feed, Francis noticed an upcoming Ghibli show in Montreal. He screamed in excitement. I stared in confusion. I, for one, had no idea what Ghibli was. So I asked him. And he explained. Simple, right?

Now explain it to us.

My pleasure.

Studio Ghibli is a Japanese animation film studio. The performers in Montreal will be playing scores from Studio Ghibli, heard in movies such as Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke—movies which I have yet to see but have heard of on numerous occasions.

While scrolling through the OVMF website, I saw a concert titled “NES Concert”. This drew my attention right away. I clicked on the link, read the description, and my heart-race increased: there is an NES Concert this October, in Montreal. Scores will be performed from games such as Kirby, Final Fantasy, Super Mario, Metroid, and more.

I asked Francis if he wanted to go, and he said yes. We will be buying our tickets in the coming days hopefully.

I have heard of many people who went to video game concerts in the past, but I have never gone to one. I am very excited for this NES Concert. Being able to hear an orchestra perform hits from classic video games is sure to send shivers down my spine—all the way to my coccyx.

Have you ever been to a video game music concert?

Chant-note: DO not REply; it is MIne, this FAcetious SOng that LAnguishes the TIp of the human DOgma.

Dark Souls 3: The Reason Of My Absence

Why hello there.

I haven’t posted in a while.

We know. We have just been so eager to hear from you.

That swells my heart!

Now now; onto the topic at hand, please.

The culprit behind my inactivity is a video game from one of my all time favorite video game franchises: the Dark Souls franchise. I have been playing Dark Souls since the release of the first one back in 2011.

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In 2016, Dark Souls 3—I just watched the video that I linked you to, and I have goosebumps all over; I adore this game, so much—was released. I bought it the moment it came out—well, I mean, not the moment it came out, but you get the idea—, and purchased the deluxe edition. The deluxe edition included all expansions that were to be released for the game in the future. The previous Dark Souls games had two to three expansions each, and for me this extra purchase was a must.

I played through about half of the game throughout the course of the first few weeks after having purchased it, but then school, work, and personal endeavors took over and Dark Souls 3 was put on the back burner.

However, after having completed my second cycle in osteopathy a few weeks ago and having received my diploma—yay!—, this game that had been calling my name for months and months finally had its prayers fulfilled: it got air time on my TV. And not just a little bit—hence my disappearance of late—but a good 20-30 hours in the past two weeks. I just finished the last boss of the game, and now all that is left are the two expansions—well, I’m almost done one of them already.

So. Much. Fun.

So. Much. Information. But would you mind telling us what Dark Souls is at least? All I can tell is that it does sound dark. And maybe fun?

Dark Souls is considered to be among the hardest and most frustrating video games ever made. It is a game where you can easily be killed by the weakest monsters in the game. It is a game in which you will die—without exaggerating—hundreds, if not thousands, of times before completing the game. Frustration is bound to ensue many times over.

Now that doesn’t sound very appealing. Frustration. More Frustration. And even some more. Where are the words “fun” and “enjoyment”?

You are right. This game is not made for everyone, although that can be said for any game. Dark Souls targets a particular audience. As a matter of fact, a few of my friends have tried it, and all but one quit out of frustration no more than 45 minutes after having started; however, the one who did enjoy it bought an Xbox 360 two days later simply to be able to play Dark Souls, because he enjoyed the experience so much. So to answer your question: the difficulty level of this game is what appeals to me, and to many others out there too. For me, too few games offer an extremely difficult and in-depth challenge to beat, something that I strive for in video games. Dark Souls offers just this.

When you beat a boss in this game—normally after many trials and having learnt through experience from the multiple deaths he has caused you—the satisfaction is immense. You managed to beat the horrible odds, and came out on top due to skill as well as trial and error tactics. And when you beat a boss, you receive his “soul essence”, and you can transfuse it into a special weapon, shield, or item, depending on the soul you acquired.

Two main causes of frustration in the game are the following:

  • All enemies always respawn once you die. All of them except bosses and mini-bosses. That means that if you just spent 42 minutes killing enemies and venturing towards the bosses’ area, and that you die, you must kill all those monsters anew to make it back to the bosses’ area. Also, if you run out of estus flasks—basically potions—you must rest at a bonfire to replenish your health and your estus flask count. However, once again, every time that you rest at a bonfire, all monsters respawn.
  • The experience points mechanism, called “souls”. Any monster you defeat yields souls. Any boss you defeat also yields souls, often many more than a typical foe. Souls are used as currency in the game, as well as for leveling up your character—the Ashen One. The catch is that if you die at any point during the game, all of your unused souls that you are carrying on you are dropped at the location of your death. If you manage to retrieve them, congratulations to you. But if you die again before picking them up, they are lost forever, and are replaced by a new soul drop where you just died. Also, you cannot simply level up at any time in the game, or else it would be too easy to always use up all your souls. You must go to see one specific character in the game to level up, and there is no other way than that. Therefore you must be extremely careful when carrying many souls on you, or else you will get very angry. Grrrr.

Now, imagine the following scenario—true story that occurred during my last two weeks of play—:

You have been killing monsters for about an hour. You stumble across a hoard of monsters—in this game a hoard is anything as little as two monsters, because they can brutally punish you by chipping away at your stamina—and you die. You drop all the souls that you have been collecting for the past hour, enough to level up about four times. You then set out to go retrieve them, but all the monsters have respawned. Easy as 3.14 pie; you decide to play more carefully and defend more frequently just to assure you make it back to your heaping souls crying out in despair on the ground, threatening to leave you if you die again on your journey back to them. And then as you are just nearby the area with your souls that were dropped, you get excited. And so you decide to run across that bridge a little less cautiously than normally. And you accidentally fall off.

Your previous soul drop is now gone.

Those souls are gone.

Forever.

Well, this long briefly summarizes Dark Souls. I am sad to hear that they will not be making a fourth game in this series because the director felt strangled by having to only create the world of Dark Souls. He wants to expand to new horizons and make new games. However, I am very happy that there are three games in this series, with around six to seven expansions throughout the series. I am already planning on playing the first one again sometime soon—probably once I finish doing everything there is to do in Dark Souls 3.

I will write some more posts with regards to Dark Souls in the future, such as explaining the lore, which I also love tremendously.

Dark-note: never leave your soul lying on the ground. You might lose it. Forever.