What Do You Do When You Feel Sick?

Recently, I was sick.

Really?

Yes.

Really, really? Are you sure you aren’t seeking attention?

Yes, really, really—slightly seeking attention as a bonus for my blog. I’m going to have to start having more attitude towards you to try and calm you, tame you.

Muhahaa, I shall never calm, nor be tamed.

Moving onward.

As I mentioned, I was sick, and even sick, I looked as cute as this:

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You weren’t lying about attitude, but you never mentioned conceitedness.

I was scheduled to be teaching assistant for the first-year part-time students in osteopathy for the past five days. If any of you are in Montreal, you know how hot it was—click here to read about the record-breaking heat wave.

I am asomatous; how do you expect me to click?

Simply don’t.

The class was being given in an AC-less building in downtown Montreal. The heat was blistering, gifting small puddles all across dress-shirts and t-shirts, to teachers and students alike.

On Thursday morning—day one of five of being the TA—I had a sensitive swollen lymph node in the anterior part of my neck, and a slight soreness in my throat. I was convinced I was going to feel worse the next day. The lymph node felt like a premonition of death’s hirelings making their mark on my body.

The next day—Friday, day two—,the lymph node was more sensitive—it also spawned a twin under my mandible—, I had a runny nose, and I had a raucous voice. I was harrumphing every 24 seconds, swallowing was painful, and I was killing trees by the minute with my nose-blowing. By the end of the day, I had a headache, little energy, and a mickle of slime spewing out my nasal cavity, sluggishly, slow as a snail, yet steadily and fiercely pacing himself for the finish line.

Woah, you can hold back on the details.

I shall not—although it doesn’t get much worse than what I just described.

Friday night, I felt lethargic and apathetic, so my friend made me some cinnamon and honey infused water in the evening, to soothe my throat—I was all out of lemon and ginger. I also took 15 drops of grapefruit seed extract (GSE) to help ward off whatever I was housing at a quicker pace than what my physiology was doing already.

That night I slept awfully. Saturday morning—day three of five—I felt like death himself, devoid my joy and splendor. I had no choice but to rise from the dead, with his scythe hacking and slashing at my throat and nose, and get ready for my third day as a TA—BBS as my English Nana would say.

No swearing on the interweb please.

That day, I had four or five cinnamon and honey concoctions, I killed several trees again, I drank two 15-drop servings of GSE, and I started coughing quite a bit. I spoke sotto voce all day, trying to stay alive until evenfall.

Class finished at 6:00 PM, I got home at 6:40, and was under my covers, in bed, at 6:52. I slept until 7:00 AM the next day—I woke up at 9:00 and 1:00 to empty my bladder, and at 11:00 to make another Baker Infusion—named in homage to my friend who made the cinnamon and honey infusion. I felt feeble and feverish all night—click here to read a previous post about how a fever works.

On Sunday—day four of five—I felt slightly, only a tittle, better. Death had left my body, but his minions were still running about, breaking and ushering cells into chaos, upheaval, and uproar. I managed to get through Montreal’s scorching heat-wave and my TA day with only several bodily qualms. I had a two hour rehearsal with my swing dance troupe that night, and I managed to go through both hours while killing only one branch of a tree—one nose-blow.

On the morrow, Monday—day five of five—,death’s minions had started going on strike, finding the working conditions too dangerous; they were under constant assault of the physiology police. The few survivors decided they should stop working under such harsh conditions, and my nose, brain, and body were grateful for the aforementioned police’s awareness and effectiveness, armed with GSE rocket launchers.

The day went by smoothly, with scanty tree-killing, a few harrumphs, and no sensitivity in my swollen cervical lymph nodes. I went to my 90-minute swing class last night, and managed to dance all night—*exaggeration alert*—in the blazing heat of another AC-less, fan-driven, paltry-ventilated room—*non-exaggeration alert*.

And here I sit, today, 86% better. Hopefully tomorrow I will be back above 94.8%.

Talk about precision.

In summary, here is what I did / do when I feel sick:

  1. Take GSE at least twice a day.
  2. Sleep more than normally.
  3. Have an awesome person create me a beverage, called the Baker Infusion—or consume lemon-ginger-honey concoctions if I have the required ingredients.

Basically: rest and take care of my body.

What do you when you feel that you are getting sick? Are you the type to summon paladins, and arm them too the tooth to fight death in the face? Or do you yield, and lie sickly in bed, weeping, waiting for it to pass its course?

Sick-note: bleh.

What Is Your Favorite Word?

Yes, yes, I’m one of those people who loves words!

Each day I take a few minutes to read the Word of the Day on the Dictionary website. It is my equivalent to a regular non-word-worm’s—I even allow myself to invent words now—morning coffee; my day seems incomplete without it.

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My caffeine is… words!

Not funny. Please, go on.

I started this daily reading about 2-3 years ago. I remember I was working as a cashier at the liquor store, and I would spend the downtime in between customers reading the previous—weeks and weeks worth—Words of the Day. A few months after having started doing this, the liquor store computer system got revamped and employees were now only allowed to browse the website that was used to search for the products of the store.

I feel like I may have been one of the causes of this provincial-wide software change—I guess I am proud of some sorts if I was, I mean, provoking a provincial-wide change: check off the bucket list!

Moving on to my words.

Here a few of my favorites—that I can recall, because honestly, remembering complex words that I have never heard of before isn’t too easy—from the past years of reading:

1. My favorite is without a doubt apotheosis. It sounds like a godlike term, hence my love for it. I love every thing about it. Every. Single. Thing. Apotheosis is a noun that depicts the “ideal example”. Used in a sentence it looks like this: Apotheosis is the apotheosis of a great word.

Well aren’t you a clever Bee.

2. Another word I love is draconian. Draconian is an adjective that refers to something “unusually severe or cruel”. Here is an example: Deirdre’s draconian methods of ruling leave the citizens in a constant state of panic. I love this word because I find it sounds just as cruel as it’s meaning. Say it a few times out loud with a deep voice and see—first take a quick look around to make sure no one is watching you, for your societal sanity’s sake: Draconian, Draconian, Draconian. Does it not sound mean and dark?

3. The last one I will share with you today is scythe, which I assume will be more known than the latter. I love the flow of letters in the word scythe because I find they flow seamlessly—alright, I will admit, even I find myself a little bit of a word-weirdo here. I also love the pronunciation. I always thought it was pronounced “sahy-the” but it is pronounced “sahyth”. To properly understand the pronunciation go to this link and click on the microphone icon. Scythe is a noun and is the tool that death wields. This tool is more commonly used by mere mortal farmers when cutting grass or grain. In a sentence, it looks like this: Death was confused when he arrived to claim the farmer’s daughter’s life, because she too was wielding a scythe.

Witty example #2. I’m on fire today—and I’m as ninja-esque as cats so I am not getting burned (refer to this post to understand the inside joke).

Congrats Jonathan. Congrats.

What are some words that you love? I’m sure there must be at least a few words that you love because of their meaning, pronunciation, sentimental value, or for some other awesome reason.

Foot-note: wielding a scythe in front of a child is the apotheosis of draconian parenting.

How Does A Board Game Co-Op Sound?

Hosting board game sessions has been a frequent activity of mine for several years. My friends and I will get together, play some games, munch on some chips, and everyone always has a great time.

Being an active board game player, I often want to acquire new games to be able to play them at game nights, but spending anywhere from 50$ (for games such as Dixit) to 100$ (for games such as Scythe) for each game quickly adds up (and this is the case for anyone who host’s game nights seeing as they often buy a good amount of the games played). Is there a simple solution that can lead to new games being brought to the table frequently without having one person spending all—or most of—the money?

Board game #1

There must be many solutions that exist, and I came up with one last week after spending a full weekend of playing board games at the board game convention in Montreal. My concept is the following: create a small co-op for each new game I’d like bring to the table to reduce the costs and still allow everyone to get to play it. Exciting, no? Yes!

Actually, I am sure you’re thinking “I have no idea what he means“.

Allow me to explain.

I would begin by finding a game I would like try which none of my friends has (it is important that I say that a majority of my friends who enjoy gaming don’t own many games of their own). Let’s take Terraforming Mars as an example. I would think of which of my board-gaming friends might be interested in playing this game and then I would send them all a message along these lines:

“Is anyone interested in trying Terraforming Mars?

It is a complex strategy game that lasts approximately two hours in which the goal is to terraform Mars. I will be planning several sessions of this game soon, but to able to do this, I—or rather we—must first get the game!

If you are interested, it will cost 10$ per person, and all remaining fees of the game will be covered by me. If we have enough willing players (anywhere from 3-7), I’ll buy the game and create a Facebook chat for those who pitched in. Through the Facebook group, I’ll organize Terraforming Mars sessions with those who participated in purchasing the game.

It will function similarly to a co-op—and of course, anyone wanting to borrow the game is more than welcome to!

Doesn’t this sound like a fun concept? I am certainly excited while writing about it!

It could allow to get new games to the table without the burdening one-man costs of frequently buying new games. Obviously I would still buy some games myself to have on my shelves at all times to be able to play it whenever I want, but at least this way new games could more frequently be brought to the table, and we all know what that means: more fun for everyone!

Question for you:

What do you think of this concept? Would you be willing to pitch in 5-10-15$ depending on the grandeur of the game to be able to get the occasion to play it? I am curious to know what you think!