What Do You Do When You Feel Sick?

Recently, I was sick.

Really?

Yes.

Really, really? Are you sure you aren’t seeking attention?

Yes, really, really—slightly seeking attention as a bonus for my blog. I’m going to have to start having more attitude towards you to try and calm you, tame you.

Muhahaa, I shall never calm, nor be tamed.

Moving onward.

As I mentioned, I was sick, and even sick, I looked as cute as this:

635932413888716556-1349135702_article sick.jpg

You weren’t lying about attitude, but you never mentioned conceitedness.

I was scheduled to be teaching assistant for the first-year part-time students in osteopathy for the past five days. If any of you are in Montreal, you know how hot it was—click here to read about the record-breaking heat wave.

I am asomatous; how do you expect me to click?

Simply don’t.

The class was being given in an AC-less building in downtown Montreal. The heat was blistering, gifting small puddles all across dress-shirts and t-shirts, to teachers and students alike.

On Thursday morning—day one of five of being the TA—I had a sensitive swollen lymph node in the anterior part of my neck, and a slight soreness in my throat. I was convinced I was going to feel worse the next day. The lymph node felt like a premonition of death’s hirelings making their mark on my body.

The next day—Friday, day two—,the lymph node was more sensitive—it also spawned a twin under my mandible—, I had a runny nose, and I had a raucous voice. I was harrumphing every 24 seconds, swallowing was painful, and I was killing trees by the minute with my nose-blowing. By the end of the day, I had a headache, little energy, and a mickle of slime spewing out my nasal cavity, sluggishly, slow as a snail, yet steadily and fiercely pacing himself for the finish line.

Woah, you can hold back on the details.

I shall not—although it doesn’t get much worse than what I just described.

Friday night, I felt lethargic and apathetic, so my friend made me some cinnamon and honey infused water in the evening, to soothe my throat—I was all out of lemon and ginger. I also took 15 drops of grapefruit seed extract (GSE) to help ward off whatever I was housing at a quicker pace than what my physiology was doing already.

That night I slept awfully. Saturday morning—day three of five—I felt like death himself, devoid my joy and splendor. I had no choice but to rise from the dead, with his scythe hacking and slashing at my throat and nose, and get ready for my third day as a TA—BBS as my English Nana would say.

No swearing on the interweb please.

That day, I had four or five cinnamon and honey concoctions, I killed several trees again, I drank two 15-drop servings of GSE, and I started coughing quite a bit. I spoke sotto voce all day, trying to stay alive until evenfall.

Class finished at 6:00 PM, I got home at 6:40, and was under my covers, in bed, at 6:52. I slept until 7:00 AM the next day—I woke up at 9:00 and 1:00 to empty my bladder, and at 11:00 to make another Baker Infusion—named in homage to my friend who made the cinnamon and honey infusion. I felt feeble and feverish all night—click here to read a previous post about how a fever works.

On Sunday—day four of five—I felt slightly, only a tittle, better. Death had left my body, but his minions were still running about, breaking and ushering cells into chaos, upheaval, and uproar. I managed to get through Montreal’s scorching heat-wave and my TA day with only several bodily qualms. I had a two hour rehearsal with my swing dance troupe that night, and I managed to go through both hours while killing only one branch of a tree—one nose-blow.

On the morrow, Monday—day five of five—,death’s minions had started going on strike, finding the working conditions too dangerous; they were under constant assault of the physiology police. The few survivors decided they should stop working under such harsh conditions, and my nose, brain, and body were grateful for the aforementioned police’s awareness and effectiveness, armed with GSE rocket launchers.

The day went by smoothly, with scanty tree-killing, a few harrumphs, and no sensitivity in my swollen cervical lymph nodes. I went to my 90-minute swing class last night, and managed to dance all night—*exaggeration alert*—in the blazing heat of another AC-less, fan-driven, paltry-ventilated room—*non-exaggeration alert*.

And here I sit, today, 86% better. Hopefully tomorrow I will be back above 94.8%.

Talk about precision.

In summary, here is what I did / do when I feel sick:

  1. Take GSE at least twice a day.
  2. Sleep more than normally.
  3. Have an awesome person create me a beverage, called the Baker Infusion—or consume lemon-ginger-honey concoctions if I have the required ingredients.

Basically: rest and take care of my body.

What do you when you feel that you are getting sick? Are you the type to summon paladins, and arm them too the tooth to fight death in the face? Or do you yield, and lie sickly in bed, weeping, waiting for it to pass its course?

Sick-note: bleh.

What Is Endometriosis?

I recently met someone who has endometriosis. If this had been 6 years ago—before my studies in osteopathy—I would have perplexedly gazed into the horizon and thought: What the heck is endometriosis? Is it a parasite? A pathology? Maybe even a super-power?

Thanks to a course I took 4 years ago—hooray!—I know what endometriosis is. Since that course 4 years ago, I have only met two people with endometriosis even though I know it is somewhat prevalent among women.

After discovering that this person—let us call her Joan—had endometriosis, the flood gates opened; I could not withhold from reading about it all over again to re-discover every nook and cranny there is to know about it.

That’s it for this post!

[Insert reader’s thoughts in the parentheses]

[Ummm…

Wait, aren’t you going to tell me what it is? The class you took, was it a class on super-powers or something?!

I want to know if this is a super-power or not!]

I’m glad that you ask. Of course I’m going to tell you! However, please take a moment to commend me on the dad joke I just pulled. It was just that funny.

Anyways.

Sadly for you—and more importantly those with endometriosis—I must inform you that this is not a super-power. Furthermore, if you’re a male, even if it was a super-power, it would be one reserved for women. Why, you ask?

Do you have a uterus?9a1b2bd8e595c1c8ee497547dda53db5.jpg

I didn’t think so, and that is why!

Briefly put, endometriosis is a health issue regarding the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus.

Image note: I find all women are Wonder Woman for dealing with an ever-changing internal equilibrium once a month. You go girl(s)!

To you I share a short summary I put together after spending about half an hour reading on endometriosis:

  • To understand endometriosis you must first know what the endometrium is. The endometrium is a tissue present in women; it is the inner most tissue of the uterus. About once a month, a part of the endometrium is expelled via menstruations at the end of the menstrual cycle if no fertilization occurred.
  • Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial cells outside of the uterus. These could be nearby (such as the ovaries or the fallopian tubes) or at a distance (such as in the lungs or in an arm).
  • 5% to 10% of woman old enough to bear children are affected by endometriosis and it is most often diagnosed from 25 to 40 years old. In many cases there is no pain associated with endometriosis and it does not affect fertility. However, there are still 30% to 40% of women diagnosed with endometriosis who are infertile.
  • The symptoms of endometriosis often occur in synergy with the menstrual cycle. Regardless of their location, endometrial cells will react to the change of hormone levels at the end of the menstrual cycle and will “bleed”. Normally, this bleeding is evacuated through menstruations; however, when the endometrial cells are located somewhere else than the uterus, there is no escape route for the cells that shed.
  • The most frequent symptoms of endometriosis are low abdominal pains similar to menstrual cramps which increase during menstruation, sexual activity and urination. It is often difficult to differentiate them from typical menstrual cramps.
  • Several alternative approaches exist that may help women affected by endometriosis, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine, yoga, meditation, osteopathy, and dietary changes.

Joan told me to add one more point—which comes from experience—:

“I would add that once the endometriosis becomes advanced, the pains no longer follow the menstrual cycle and appear sporadically without an identifiable cause.” (Joana, 2017. Retrieved from the prestigious scientific database known as Facebook Messenger).

I hope I managed to help you learn something new with this post!

Do you know anyone who has endometriosis? If so, did you know what it was before they told you? Or did you learn about it thanks to them?

Footnote: I still wish this was a super-power.

References: passport santé; Facebook Messenger, the prestigious scientific database.