I Am Proud

This will be a quick post, and mostly a boastful one. But hey, I think I deserve it—actually, I know I do! I’ve been working on my mémoire for the past year and a half, and I submitted my final version yesterday.

After having graduated from the 1st cycle of osteopathic studies in December 2015, I had to decide between two options for the 2nd cycle. My choices dwindled down to:4790331313_8f291f6480.jpg

  • Mémoire: consists of doing either a quantitative or qualitative study. The mémoire requires a large amount of research, dedication, no procrastination, and a lot of writing, which are all mainly stuff I dislike—beside procrastination, that, I bathe in!
  • Clinicat: consists of working for several days in a clinic supervised by an experienced osteopath, writing a case report, taking several post-1st cycle classes, and some more—et cetera.

Throughout the four and a half year 1st cycle program, I was convinced I was going to do the clinicat seeing as I profoundly dislike research. However, one month before having to submit the form stating which 2nd cycle program I’d like to do, I had a paradigm shift; all of a sudden I wanted to do the mémoire. Why? Simply because I thought I’d get more out of it in the long run. I also didn’t think the clinicat would bring me much of anything. The thought of doing the clinicat instead of the mémoire up until then had always been the choice of the easy path, a path I am all too used to trotting down.

But wait. Didn’t you just say you hated doing research?

Indeed I did.

I still do.

And maybe I always will.

It was the first time in my life—I think—that I came to the realization of choosing a path because of what it would bring me throughout the journey. I’ve always been someone who likes taking the easy path—although I still put in the necessary work, with a good chunk of awesome procrastination—and for one of the first times I decided to take the path less enticing in exchange for greater personal growth.

That is why I am feeling proud, right now. A grin carved its way across my face yesterday only several minutes after having handed in my final version of my mémoire. I was, and am, proud of myself.

[Celestial high-five!]

I also have trouble giving myself credit in everyday life, so I am doubly proud of having written this blog post.

[Interdimensional high-five!]

When was the last time you were profoundly moved by your own action / accomplishment / anything special to you? I’d love to hear some of your heart-warming tales.

References: Jonathan Naylor’s proud brain.

What Is Endometriosis?

I recently met someone who has endometriosis. If this had been 6 years ago—before my studies in osteopathy—I would have perplexedly gazed into the horizon and thought: What the heck is endometriosis? Is it a parasite? A pathology? Maybe even a super-power?

Thanks to a course I took 4 years ago—hooray!—I know what endometriosis is. Since that course 4 years ago, I have only met two people with endometriosis even though I know it is somewhat prevalent among women.

After discovering that this person—let us call her Joan—had endometriosis, the flood gates opened; I could not withhold from reading about it all over again to re-discover every nook and cranny there is to know about it.

That’s it for this post!

[Insert reader’s thoughts in the parentheses]

[Ummm…

Wait, aren’t you going to tell me what it is? The class you took, was it a class on super-powers or something?!

I want to know if this is a super-power or not!]

I’m glad that you ask. Of course I’m going to tell you! However, please take a moment to commend me on the dad joke I just pulled. It was just that funny.

Anyways.

Sadly for you—and more importantly those with endometriosis—I must inform you that this is not a super-power. Furthermore, if you’re a male, even if it was a super-power, it would be one reserved for women. Why, you ask?

Do you have a uterus?9a1b2bd8e595c1c8ee497547dda53db5.jpg

I didn’t think so, and that is why!

Briefly put, endometriosis is a health issue regarding the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus.

Image note: I find all women are Wonder Woman for dealing with an ever-changing internal equilibrium once a month. You go girl(s)!

To you I share a short summary I put together after spending about half an hour reading on endometriosis:

  • To understand endometriosis you must first know what the endometrium is. The endometrium is a tissue present in women; it is the inner most tissue of the uterus. About once a month, a part of the endometrium is expelled via menstruations at the end of the menstrual cycle if no fertilization occurred.
  • Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial cells outside of the uterus. These could be nearby (such as the ovaries or the fallopian tubes) or at a distance (such as in the lungs or in an arm).
  • 5% to 10% of woman old enough to bear children are affected by endometriosis and it is most often diagnosed from 25 to 40 years old. In many cases there is no pain associated with endometriosis and it does not affect fertility. However, there are still 30% to 40% of women diagnosed with endometriosis who are infertile.
  • The symptoms of endometriosis often occur in synergy with the menstrual cycle. Regardless of their location, endometrial cells will react to the change of hormone levels at the end of the menstrual cycle and will “bleed”. Normally, this bleeding is evacuated through menstruations; however, when the endometrial cells are located somewhere else than the uterus, there is no escape route for the cells that shed.
  • The most frequent symptoms of endometriosis are low abdominal pains similar to menstrual cramps which increase during menstruation, sexual activity and urination. It is often difficult to differentiate them from typical menstrual cramps.
  • Several alternative approaches exist that may help women affected by endometriosis, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine, yoga, meditation, osteopathy, and dietary changes.

Joan told me to add one more point—which comes from experience—:

“I would add that once the endometriosis becomes advanced, the pains no longer follow the menstrual cycle and appear sporadically without an identifiable cause.” (Joana, 2017. Retrieved from the prestigious scientific database known as Facebook Messenger).

I hope I managed to help you learn something new with this post!

Do you know anyone who has endometriosis? If so, did you know what it was before they told you? Or did you learn about it thanks to them?

Footnote: I still wish this was a super-power.

References: passport santé; Facebook Messenger, the prestigious scientific database.